<![CDATA[Jeremy Wineberg - blog]]>Sat, 10 Nov 2018 04:47:25 -0600Weebly<![CDATA[artist in absentia . . . coming to the bubbler]]>Tue, 29 Dec 2015 02:22:32 GMThttp://jeremywineberg.net/blog/artist-in-absentia-coming-to-the-bubblerHappy to announce that I have been asked to help design an upcoming exhibition at the Bubbler involving artists from the Oakhill Prison Humanities Project.  The project is run by University of Wisconsin grad students and faculty volunteers that teach art, literature and cultural studies to inmates at the Oakhill correctional facility in Oregon, WI.  The inmates participating in the exhibition will be the artist in absentia in the Bubbler's artist in residency program.  There work will inhabit the bubbler maker space at the central library instead of the artist themselves, who continue to serve their sentences at Oakhill.  The project and the exhibition will also be the subject of a documentary by Marc Kornblatt, whose Dostoyevski Behind Bars also involved the inmates at Oakhill.]]><![CDATA[drawing show at MPL . . .´╗┐]]>Mon, 21 Dec 2015 02:00:22 GMThttp://jeremywineberg.net/blog/drawing-show-at-mplJust found out that I will be participating in a survey show of contemporary drawing at The Diane Endres Ballweg Gallery at Central Madison Public Library in Janiuary call Luck of the Draw.  More information coming soon . . . ]]><![CDATA[Spackle Madison´╗┐ Best of 2015]]>Sat, 12 Dec 2015 14:25:25 GMThttp://jeremywineberg.net/blog/spackle-madison-best-of-2015This year's list of the best art experiences by the local arts insiders is out.   It has been meticulously complied by artist, educator and curator Rachael Bruya who asked a dozen artists, curators, professors and other artsy-type peoples to pick a favorite.  I was happy to contribute with a write up of Waterways at The Watrous Gallery last March.  I was also excited that Gravity Shifts was picked as a favorite by Madison artist and lecturer Barb Landes and Paul Sullivan:
Gravity Shifts swept through the long, wide gallery space and filled it with silhouetted forms in black paint and hand-cut mirrored mylar. Each part mesmerized us with its clean precision and narrative detail and moved us with its gestural power and visual accessibility. The riffled distortions of the shiny mylar upended and shattered everything caught in its reflection casting viewers into parts of the installation they couldn’t just then see. Complicated figures spilled across the wall with the fullness of stop action sequences and the simplicity of paper dolls. Among the masterful variations was one of barely separated moments of a figure losing a battle with gravity and her grip on a child. The deft compositional connectedness of the installation made taking it all seem oh so possible. We moved from image to image trying to do just that and failed. As much as we “connected the dots” of content, juxtapositions and reflections, we could sense the whole but never own it. As with the ways of great art, as with the imperturbable laws of nature.
Read more picks by Karin Wolf, Michael Villequette, Scott Espeseth, Angela Richardson, Racheal Bruya, Bernadette Witzack, Tazie LeMay, Jason Ruhl, Martha Glowacki and Douglas Rosenberg and check out their fantastic spread of the art scene in 2015 here.
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<![CDATA[december studio notions]]>Wed, 09 Dec 2015 02:21:38 GMThttp://jeremywineberg.net/blog/december-studio-notions
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<![CDATA[november studio notions]]>Sat, 07 Nov 2015 17:42:16 GMThttp://jeremywineberg.net/blog/november-studio-notions
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<![CDATA[working on a book . . .]]>Fri, 30 Oct 2015 13:44:04 GMThttp://jeremywineberg.net/blog/working-on-a-bookOver the last two years I have been working in a book that I had bound with friend and fellow artist Teresa Getty, every month or so we swap swap it and work over and through each others work.  
We had initially limited ourselves to black and white media, ink, gesso, silver leaf and silver point.  There has been quite a bite of cutting and a few odd and ends thrown in as well.
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